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Research


The Research Department at the Hincks-Dellcrest Centre undertakes research to understand the basis for children’s social and emotional problems, and to test and evaluate innovative interventions. Findings from research contribute to improving mental health in children and their families as well as preventing mental health problems from occurring or intensifying. These are issues that have a true impact on the development of children and the quality of their lives.

We strive to understand and develop new ideas and share and disseminate our findings in a variety of ways. Findings from research also underpin training and inform clinical practice. In turn, these activities inform the research we undertake.

Staff and Associates Current Research Projects  |  Current Community Research Activities
Completed Projects  |  Publications  |  Products for Purchase


Research Department Staff and Associates

Director: Nancy J. Cohen, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Dr. Cohen is currently Director of Research at the Hincks-Dellcrest Centre for Children's Mental Health and the Hincks-Dellcrest Institute. She is Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at University of Toronto and Adjunct Professor of Psychology at OISE/UT and York University. Dr. Cohen is a researcher, clinician, and teacher in areas related to child and family mental health, including infant mental health, adoption, and the interface of language impairment and child psychopathology. Dr. Cohen has published and spoken widely and is a frequent reviewer for a number of journals.

Research Department Affiliates:

Jim Duvall, M.Ed., R.S.W.; Nusrat Husain, M.D.; Marshall Korenblum, M.D., F.R.C.P.(C); Diane Philipp, M.D., F.R.C.P.(C); Alex Russell, Ph.D., C.Psych.

Research Fellow:

Fataneh Farnia, Ph.D.

Research Training:

The Research Department is involved in training and supervision of students at the undergraduate, graduate, and post-graduate levels. There currently is a funded Research Fellow who is spending 2-3 years at the Centre both working collaboratively with others and developing her own program of research. Students and volunteers come from a range of disciplines.

Research Department projects and studies have been funded by the following:

Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR)
Canadian Language & Literacy Research Network (CLLRNet)
Centre of Excellence for Child and Youth Mental Health at CHEO
Lawson Foundation
Social Development Partnerships Program
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC)
University of Western Ontario, funded to support 6 Nations/Caledonia Project

 

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CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

Closing the Gap: Toward an Integrative Model of Language, Cognition, and Psychiatric Disorder in Adolescence

Principal Investigator: Nancy J. Cohen, Ph.D., C.Psych. Trent University
Co-Investigators: Nancie Im-Bolter, Ph.D., C.Psych.; Marshall Korenblum, M.D., F.R.C.P.(C); Zohreh Yaghoub Zadeh, Ph.D. ; Canadian Council on Learning, Vancouver, Fataneh Farnia, Ph.D.
Description: This research focuses on the interrelation between language, thought (cognitions), and maladaptive psychosocial functioning in adolescents referred for psychiatric service and normally developing adolescents with a special focus on the mediating role of higher order language. Clinic and community-based studies have shown that a large portion of children with psychiatric disorders have a language impairment (LI) with estimates ranging from 50% to 80%. Adolescence is a unique developmental period characterized by dramatic biological, social, and cognitive changes. The demands on language for both social and academic adjustment shift dramatically during this age period. Competent higher order language requires integration of cognitive, affective, communicative, and social information. Applying an integrative framework, the specific objectives of the proposed study are to: (1) describe and determine the prevalence of structural and higher order language difficulties of youth presenting for psychiatric service, and (2) examine the complex relationship between language, psychiatric disorder, and cognitive and social cognitive functions. Using mixed methods and working within an interdisciplinary collaborative group, this research will produce findings that contribute to understanding adolescent psychiatric disturbance and to collaboration in the clinic and the community (e.g., in schools).
Funded by: Canadian Institute of Health Research; Centre of Excellence for Child and Youth Mental Health at CHEO

How Early Can Risk Factors for Language and Literacy Problems be Identified?

Co-Principal Investigators: Nancy J. Cohen, Ph.D., C.Psych. & Charles Ungerleider, Ph.D. (Canadian Council on Learning, Vancouver)
Co-Investigators: Zohreh Yaghoub Zadeh, Ph.D. (Canadian Council on Learning, Vancouver); Fataneh Farnia, Ph.D.
Description: Oral language and reading comprehension are dynamic developmental processes that have long been thought to depend on literacy practices at home in the early years of life (i.e., 0 to 5 years). Research has shown that child’s accomplishment in oral language and reading comprehension depends on the successful integration of early component language skills and home literacy, adequate development of cognitive processes, social cognitive skills, interpersonal relationships, and attachment behaviours. Inadequate development of one or more of these skills will increase the risk for later oral language and reading comprehension problems in early school age children with an increased susceptibility in children aged 8 to 11 years. The goal of the systematic literature review is to determine how early in development we can identify the risk factors that influence occurrence of oral language and reading comprehension problems.
Funded by: Canadian Language and Literacy Research Network

Handle with Care: Training for Promoting the Mental Health of Young Children in Community-Based Child Care

Principal Investigator: Nancy J. Cohen, Ph.D., C.Psych.
Co-Investigators: Heidi Kiefer, M.Ed.; Bonnie Pape, M.Ed., M. Sc. (consultant)
Description: Substantial evidence indicates that the foundations of mental health are shaped from the earliest days of life. Research has provided a deeper understanding about environmental influences and how underlying neural connections are formed. Child care centres are considered important settings for mental health promotion as more working parents enroll their children at increasingly younger ages. The Handle with Care training workshop was developed to equip child care practitioners with ideas and techniques for promoting the mental health of children from birth to age six. This project builds on previous work completed under SDPP funding that resulted in the booklet entitled Handle with Care: Strategies for Promoting the Mental Health of Young Children in Community-Based Child Care, which contains strategies based on evidence-based practices and actual examples from practitioners in centres across the country. The booklet and training emphasize enhancing children’s social and emotional development, building family and community connections and creating a positive work climate for practitioners. In turn, the training program provides comprehensive manuals and materials (English and French) for leading either train-the-trainer or front-line practitioner workshops. In spring 2007, a small number of professionals involved in child care and mental health consultation roles from all provinces and the Yukon participated in pilot train-the-trainer workshops. This enabled them to work as Handle with Care facilitators and deliver training to child care practitioners in their regions. Currently, these facilitators are implementing workshops in their home provinces. Project assistance is ongoing as facilitators mount training and form networks with relevant organizations to increase sustainability.
Funded by: Social Development Partnerships Program
For further information about the program and/or training opportunities, please contact Dr. Nancy Cohen at: nancy.cohen@utoronto.ca

The Relationship between Specific Language Impairment and Reading Disability

Principal Investigator: Nancie Im-Bolter. Ph.D., C.Psych. (Trent University).
Co-Investigator: Nancy J. Cohen, Ph.D., C.Psych.
Description: It is widely recognized that oral language and reading skills have intimate and important connections to each other. We know that there is a clear relationship between language and literacy both in normally developing children and in children with reading problems. This research investigates how language, processing capacity, and executive function (abilities that direct, organize, and mediate problem solving) impact the development of literacy in children with language impairment and with reading disability. Specifically, this project will: a) compare the reading and language profiles of children with language impairment and children with reading disability, b) examine the question of whether language impairment and reading disability can be explained by a common mechanism versus different underlying mechanisms, and c) investigate the degree to which language skill, phonological skill, processing capacity, and executive function contribute to reading. This research represents a comprehensive and systematic examination into the nature of the reading difficulties that children with language impairment experience and the language difficulties that children with reading disability experience. Findings from this research will also serve to highlight the importance of oral language skills in reading competence. Structural language is important for building a foundation of language competence, but it also contributes to the development of more advanced reading skill necessary for academic success. Findings from this empirical work should provide information that will lead to more informed and effective interventions for students experiencing a variety of learning difficulties. This may facilitate curriculum development for all children.
Funded by: Canadian Language and Literacy Research Network

Narrative Research Project: Moment-to-moment Change in Therapy

Principal Investigators: Adrienne Chambon, M.S.W., Ph.D., University of Toronto, Faculty of Social Work; Faye Mishna, M.S.W., Ph.D., R.S.W., University of Toronto, Faculty of Social Work
Co-Investigators: Jim Duvall, M.Ed., R.S.W., Brief Therapy Training Centres-International, Hincks-Dellcrest Centre/Gail Appel Institute; Laura Beres, Ph.D., Research Associate, University of Western Ontario; Kings College
Collaborators: Scot Cooper, B.A., Research Team, Halderman-Norfolk Reach; Karen Young, M.S.W., Research Team, (R.O.C.K.); Eric King, M.S.W., R.S.W., Pine River Institute; Ellen Katz, M.S.W., R.S.W., Hincks-Dellcrest Centre
Description: This project is integrated into an advanced extern training program in Brief and Narrative Therapy. This collaborative project with University of Toronto, Faculty of social Work, integrates training, therapy and research. Families served through the program access it through the intake process of HDC. Now in the second phase, corresponding to the pilot phase of the project, Team members will focus on the three main features identified in the preliminary phase: (a) the circulation of language within a session, (b) turning point moments or in-the-moment realizations experienced by clients, (c) the activities and effects of the outsider witness team. The objectives of this second phase are to develop procedures to track moment-to-moment activities and transformation (particularly in narrative terms, and as they may relate to complementary approaches) and to link these features to therapy outcomes.
Funding for this phase has been obtained in the form of a Royal Bank Doctoral Fellowship form the Faculty of Social Work of the University of Toronto for the academic year 2003-2004.

Ethically-based Practice: Process, Effects and Pivotal Moments of Narrative Therapy

Principal Investigator: Laura Beres, Ph.D., Research Associate, University of Western Ontario, Kings College
Co-Investigator: Jim Duvall, M.Ed., R.S.W., Brief Therapy Training Centres-International, Hincks-Dellcrest Centre/Gail Appel Institute
Collaborators: Michael White B.S.W.; Scot Cooper, B.A., Haldimand-Norfolk R.E.A.C.H.; Karen Young, M.S.W., Halton Child and Family Services.
Description: Béres (P.I.) and Duvall (co-applicant) have been involved in a qualitative and descriptive study of Narrative Therapy as it is trained at Brief Therapy Training Centres-International, Hincks-Dellcrest Centre, Gail Appel Institute. This is a joint project with the University of Toronto, Faculty of Social Work, and Dr. Adrienne Chambon and Dr. Faye Mishna, in particular. Young and Cooper (collaborators) joined in this study in its later stages. This study was an exploratory and descriptive study of the particular approach to Narrative Therapy trained within the Extern training program at the Hincks-Dellcrest Institute. We examined videotapes of trainee led therapy sessions, gathered field notes of the teaching segments presented and the trainees maintained a community journal gathering their observations of the pivotal moments of the training. This study resulted in our thinking much more specifically about pivotal moments and the circulation of language in Narrative Therapy as well as the importance of outsider witnessing. A concept map was developed out of this work which has been presented at conferences. This has been submitted for publication with The Qualitative Report. We have also submitted a book proposal to W.W. Norton & Company, entitled, Narrative Therapy: Connecting Practice, Training and Research.


The research development initiative we are now proposing has been influenced by this prior exploratory research. This new study will involve a greater range of clients and trainers as participant-researchers, and include the active participation of three children’s mental health centres in Southern Ontario. It will also include consultation consultation/collaboration with Michael White and David Epston as the originators of Narrative Therapy and an of outcomes/effects as well as process in a variety of settings.
Funded by: Proposal submitted to Government; SSHRC

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CURRENT COMMUNITY RESEARCH ACTIVITIES

Neighbouring Communities Project: Responding to Communities with Aboriginal Land Claims

Principle Investigator: Laura Beres, M.S.W., Ph.D. R.S.W., University of Western Ontario, Kings College, Faculty of Social Work.
Co-investigator: Jim Duvall, M.Ed., R.S.W.
Collaborators: Michael White B.S.W.; Scot Cooper, B.A.; Karen Young, M.S.W.
Six Nations and Caledonia Communities’ Team. (2007). Neighboring Communities Project: Six Nations and Caledonia: Haldimand-Norfolk R.E.A.C.H. and Ganohkwasra.
Description: There are many outstanding Aboriginal land claims in Canada. These land claim disputes have at times resulted in conflict between Aboriginal and Non-aboriginal communities. Traditional forms of conflict resolution and mediation have not been successful in resolving these concerns quickly. In the mean time, communities are left to struggle with the effects of the stress and tension associated with blockades and demonstrations. This project investigates the practice experience of using Narrative Outsider Witnessing to facilitate multiple stakeholder consultations and community-wide gatherings in the Caledonia and Six Nations area of Southwestern Ontario in Canada. The process of working collaboratively with Aboriginal and Non-aboriginal social workers and community workers will be described, highlighting the interview process and preparation for the large meetings as well as the structuring of the community-wide gatherings. These community-wide gatherings, rather than focusing on the content of the dispute or conflict resolution, focused on what the wider membership of both communities most wished for. In particular, they were most concerned about re-building relationships across communities and the safety of their children.
Funded by: University of Western Ontario, King’s College

Support Program for Expelled
Evaluator: Helen O'Halpin, M.D., F.R.C.P.(C)
Description: This program is an ongoing study of all students expelled from Metro Toronto Schools and referred to the program (N: 75 to date). Characteristics of students and family profiles are being developed regarding demographic data, ethnicity, progress in program, and outcome following discharge. This is a joint Metro Toronto support and Hincks-Dellcrest Centre project.

Ego Functions Assessment: A Screening Instrument for Suitability for Short-Term Individual Therapy in Adolescents (ongoing study).

Co-Investigator: Marshall Korenblum, M.D., F.R.C.P.(C)

Description: Brief therapy has become an important new treatment modality for certain focal problems, but is not suitable for everyone. In adults, a semi-structured interview called the Ego Functions Assessment has been used to select appropriate patients and to measure change pre- and post-therapy with good reliability and validity. This measure currently is being piloted with adolescents to determine reliability among clinicians' ratings. As nothing has been published about its potential use with adolescents, a protocol will be developed to assess its utility as a screening instrument for brief (individual psychodynamic) therapy and as a measure of outcome.

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COMPLETED PROJECTS

Children from China: A Prospective Study of their Health and Development

This study documented the post-adoptive health and physical, motor, cognitive, language, and social-emotional development of infants adopted from China and family adjustment. Children and families were initially seen within one month of the child's arrival to Canada, 6, 12, and 24 months later when the children were approximately 3 years of age. Chinese adoptees were compared with Canadian-born children. Findings from this research are important for adopting families, adoption professionals, practitioners and policy makers. This study was done in collaboration with two adoption agencies, Children's Bridge and Open Arms to Adoption.

Early Childhood Care and Mental Health Project

This project investigated how Canadian child care centres promote the mental health of children from infancy to 6 years. It emphasized classroom strategies, relationships with parents, staff well-being and collaboration with community resources. The aim was to collect and convey existing practices that foster critical areas of social-emotional development identified by research. Findings are detailed within a resource booklet available to child care providers. Existing research will also be considered within the context of current child care issues to inform various early childhood professionals and policymakers. This project was done in collaboration with the Canadian Mental Health Association.

The TLC3 Project: Fostering Early Language and Cognitive Development

TLC3 was a national project that provided quality early learning programs for children aged birth to five years, at seven sites across Canada. The project was aimed at discovering the kinds of programs that worked best with children in different settings to foster early language and cognitive development. Research of this kind is important to understand the characteristics of early environments necessary for readiness to learn and engagement in healthy social relationships.

A Longitudinal Study of Children Enrolled in Early Intervention and Prevention Programs: A National Perspective

The research followed 120 children who participated in a national demonstration project (TLC3) at an important transition point in development, the end of their kindergarten year when they were on the brink of entering Grade 1. TLC3 involved seven sites across Canada delivering a range of interventions aimed at enhancing the language and cognitive development of children 0 to 5 years within the context of important early relationships. Most of these children lived in families at risk because of factors associated with low socioeconomic status. Readiness for school was measured in relation to a comparison sample and to provincial and national Canadian samples. This project was part of the Canadian Language and Literacy Research Network.

Watch, Wait, and Wonder: Testing the Effectiveness of a New Approach to Mother-Infant Psychotherapy

This project evaluated an innovative strategy for treating troubled parent-infant relationships comparing it to a more traditional psychotherapeutic approach. Research findings indicated that although both treatments were successful, the Watch, Wait, and Wonder intervention brought about more rapid changes in infant attachment security, maternal well-being, parenting confidence, and infant development. Research of this kind is important to help parents and infants who are referred for mental health treatment.

The Social Language Study: Understanding the Relation between Children’s Narrative Discourse and Socioemotional Problems

Approximately one-half of the children attending mental health clinics have language impairments. This study examined the quality of children's language and communication skills in emotionally provocative situations. The findings of this research will help to understand factors that influence children's social and emotional functioning. Research of this kind is important because both educational and therapeutic programs rely heavily on language skills.

Boundless Adventures Association's Early Intervention Pilot Project

This evaluation examined the implementation and outcomes of a crime prevention initiative for high-need, under-resourced families with children aged 2 to 6 years. The program combined wilderness/challenge-based programming with community based follow-up activities and had three broad objects which were to strengthen family relationships, provide mothers with skill-and confidence-building experiences through a challenge based curriculum, and strengthening families' community and social supports.

Other projects were designed to:
1. Evaluate the outcomes of focused family therapies;
2. Evaluate the outcomes of a community-based intervention for high-risk families.

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PUBLICATIONS

All articles are available at no cost
For copies please contact Mirvana Kimball at: institute.research@hincksdellcrest.org

INFANT MENTAL HEALTH AND INTERVENTION

Journal Articles (listed in chronological order, most recent first):
Cohen, N.J., Lojkasek, M., Yaghoub Zadeh, Z., Pugliese, M., & Kiefer, H., (2008). Children adopted from China: A longitudinal study of their growth and development. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 49, 458- 468.

Cohen, N.J. (2003). Overlap of communication impairments and social-emotional problems in infants. IMPrint, 37, 19-21.

Cohen, N.J., Muir, E., & Lojkasek, M. (2003). Watch, Wait, & Wonder: Ein kindzentriertes psychotherapie- programm zur behandlung gestörter Mutter-Kind-Bezienhungen. Kinderanalyse, 58-79.

Cohen, N.J., Lojkasek, M., & Muir, E. (2003). Watch, Wait, and Wonder: An infant-led approach to infant-parent psychotherapy. IMPrint, 35,17-19.

Cohen, N.J, Lojkasek, M., Muir, E., Muir, R., & Parker, C.J. (2002). Six month follow-up of two mother-infant psychotherapies: Convergence of therapeutic outcomes. Infant Mental Health Journal 23, 361-380.

Muir, E., Lojkasek, M., & Cohen, N. (2000). Observing mothers observing their infants: An infant observation approach to early intervention. PRISME, 31,154-170. (French version)

Muir, E., Lojkasek, M., & Cohen, N. (1999). Observant parents: Intervening through observation. Infant observation: The International Journal of Infant Observation and Its Application, 3,11-23.

Cohen, N.J., Muir, E., Lojkasek, M., Muir, R., Parker, C.J., Barwick, M., & Brown, M. (1999). Watch, Wait, and Wonder: Testing the effectiveness of a new approach to mother-infant psychotherapy. Infant Mental Health Journal, 20, 429-451.

Book Chapters (listed in chronological order, most recent first):
Lojkasek, M., Muir, E. , & Cohen, N.J. (in press). Watch, Wait, and Wonder: A play-based approach to mother-infant psychotherapy. In Schaefer, C.E., McCormick, J. Kelly-Zion, P., & Ohnogi, A. (Eds.). Play therapy for very young children.

Cohen, N.J., Muir, E., & Lojkasek, M. (2003). The first couple: Using Watch, Wait, and Wonder to change troubled mother-infant relationships. In. S.M. Johnson & V. Whiffen (Eds.) Attachment processes in couple and family therapy, pp. 215-233. New York: Guilford.

Research Summaries/Brochures (listed in chronological order, most recent first):
Cohen, N.J., Muir, E., Lojkasek, M., Muir, R., Parker, C.J., Barwick, M., & Brown, M. (March, 1999). Watch, Wait, and Wonder: Testing the Effectiveness of a New Approach to Mother-Infant Intervention.

Barwick, M., Cohen, N.J., Horodezky, N.B., & Lojkasek, M. (February, 1999). Linking Babies’ Attachment Relationships with Emerging Communication and Language Skills.

MENTAL HEALTH PROMOTION

Journal Articles (listed in chronological order, most recent first):
Kiefer, H., Cohen, N.J., & Pape, B. (2008). Mental health promotion awareness and training in childcare, Child and Family Journal, 11, 28-32.

Cohen, N.J., Kiefer, H., & Pape, B. (2006). Handle with Care: Early Childhood Care and Mental Health Promotion, IMPrint.

Cohen, N.J., Kiefer, H., Pape, B. (2005). Handle with care: Early childhood care and mental health promotion. IMPrint, 43, 11-13.

Cohen, N.J. (2001). The TLC3 Project: A national initiative to enhance language and cognitive development of children from birth to 5 years. Journal of Speech and Language Pathology and Audiology, Vol. 25, 103- 115.

Landy, S. (2004). Tool for determining type and frequency of family home visitor intervention. Toronto: Toronto Public Health.

Landy, S. (2004). Understanding the personality characteristics of neglectful parents and developing appropriate interventions. IMPrint, 40, 3-8.

Martin, F., & Cohen, N.J. (Fall 2003). Nurturing creativity: Learning from the TLC3 Experience, Interaction, 19-21.

Landy, S. (2000). The impact of maternal depression on child development. IMprint, 27, 16-20.

Oyen, A-S., Landy, S., & Hilburn-Cobb, C. (2000). Maternal attachment and emotional availability in an at-risk population. Attachment and Human Development, 2(2):203-217.

Landy, S. (2000). Riding a roller coaster: Working with a young mother and her preschool children. IMPrint, 28, 7-12.

Landy, S., & Munroe, S. (1998). Shared parenting: Assessing the success of a foster parent program aimed at family reunification. Child Abuse and Neglect, 22, 305-318.

Landy, S., & Menna, R. (1997). Mother’s reactions to the aggressive play of their aggressive and non-aggressive young children: Implications for caregivers. Early Child Development and Care, 138, 1-20.

Book:
Landy, S. (2002). Pathways to competence. Encouraging healthy social and emotional development in young children. Baltimore: M.D. Paul H. Brooks, Publishing Co.

Reports (listed in chronological order, most recent first):
Cohen, N.J., Pape, B., & Kiefer, H. (2005). Early childhood care and mental health: Enhancing the capacity of day care to promote mental health and prevent future problems. Human Resources Development Canada.

Cohen, N.J. (2003) A Longitudinal Study of Children Enrolled in Early Intervention and Prevention Programs: A National Perspective

Cohen, N.J., & Radford, J. (July, 1999). The Impact of Early Childhood Intervention on Later Life. Report prepared for Health Canada, NHRDP, Synthesis and Dissemination Section, Research and Knowledge Development Division.

LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT AND CHILD PSYCHOPATHOLOGY

Journal Articles (listed in chronological order, most recent first):
Yaghoub Zadeh, Z., Im-Bolter, N., & Cohen, N.J. (2007). Social cognition and externalizing psychopathology: An investigation of the mediating role of language. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 35, 141-152.

Im-Bolter, N., Cohen, N.J., & Vallance, D.D. (2007). When pictures become words: The content and structure of narratives of clinic and non-clinic referred children, Special issue of Pediatric Clinic of North America, 54, 525-542.

Cohen, N.J. Vallance, D.D., Barwick, M., Im, N., Menna, R., Horodezky, N.B., & Isaacson L. (2000). The interface between ADHD and language impairment: An examination of language, achievement, and cognitive processing. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 41, 353-362.

Cohen, N.J. (2004). Language development. Centres of Excellence in Early Child Development. Online encyclopedia.Vallance, D.D., Im, N., & Cohen, N.J. (1999). Discourse deficits associated with psychiatric disorder and with language impairments in children. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 40,693- 704.

Cohen, N.J., Horodezky, N. (1998). Language impairments and psychopathology. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 461-462.

Cohen, N.J., Barwick, M.A., Horodezky, N.B., Vallance, D. D., & Im, N. (1998). Language, achievement, and cognitive processing in psychiatrically disturbed children with previously identified and unsuspected language impairments. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 39, 865-877.

Cohen. N.J., Menna, R., Vallance, D.D., Barwick, M.A., Im, N., & Horodezky, N.B. (1998). Language, social cognitive processing, and behavioral characteristics of psychiatrically disturbed children with previously identified and unsuspected language impairments. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 39, 853- 864.

Books (listed in chronological order, most recent first):
Cohen, N.J. (2001). Language impairment and psychopathology in infants, children, and adolescents. New York: Sage Publications.

Beitchman, Cohen, N.J., Konstantareas, M. M., & Tannock, R. (1996). Language, learning, behaviour disorders. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Book Chapters (listed in chronological order, most recent first):
Bolter, N., & Cohen, N.J. (2007). Language impairment and psychiatric co-morbidities. In R.L. Russell & M. Simms (Eds.) Special issue of Pediatric Clinics of North America. (Language, Communication, Literacy, Pathologies and Treatments) 54, 525-542.

Cohen, N.J. (2002). Developmental language disorder. In P. Howlin & O. Udwin (Eds.), Outcomes in neurodevelopmental and genetic disorders, (pp.26-55). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge. University Press.

Cohen, N.J. (1996). Psychiatrically disturbed children with unsuspected language impairments: Developmental differences in language and behaviour. In J. Beitchman, N.J. Cohen, M.M. Konstantareas, & R. Tannock (Eds.), Language, learning and behaviour disorders: Emerging perspectives (pp. 105-127). New York: Cambridge University Press.

Literature Review (listed in chronological order, most recent first):
Cohen, N.J., Zadeh, Z., Farnia, F., & Ungerleider, C. (2006). How early can children at risk for problems in reading comprehension be identified, Canadian Language and Literacy Research Network.

Research Summaries/Brochures:
Barwick, M., Cohen, N.J., Horodezky, N.B., & Lojkasek, M. (February, 1999). Linking Babies’Attachment Relationships with Emerging Communication and Language Skills.

Cohen, N.J., Barwick, M.A., Horodezky, N., Im, N., Isaacson, L., Menna, R., & Vallance, D. (March, 1997). Making the Connection: Language, Learning, and Social Behaviour of Children Referred to Mental Health Clinics.

ADOPTION


Journal Articles (listed in chronological order, most recent first):
Cohen, N.J., Lojkasek, M., Yaghoub Zadeh, Z., Pugliese, M., & Kiefer, H., (2008). Children Adopted from China: A longitudinal study of their growth and development. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 49, 458- 468.

Cohen, N.J., Coyne, J.C., & Duvall, J.D. (1996). Parents' sense of "entitlement" in adoptive and nonadoptive families, Family Process, 35, 441-456.

Cohen, N.J., Coyne, J.C., & Duvall, J. (1993). Adopted and biological children in the clinic: Family, parental and child characteristics, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 34, 545-562.

Book Chapters (listed in chronological order, most recent first):
Cohen, N.J. (2008). Adoption: In M. Rutter et al. (Eds.), Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: Modern Approaches, (pp.502-518). Oxford, UK: Blackwell Science.

Im-Bolter, N. & Cohen, N.J. (2007). Language impairment and psychiatric comorbidity. In R.L. Russell & M. Simms (Eds.) Special issue of Pediatric Clinics of North America. (Language, Communication, Literacy, Pathologies and Treatments) 54, 525-542.

Cohen, N.J. (2002). Adoption. Contemporary trends in adoption policy and practice. In M. Rutter et al.(Eds.), Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: Modern approaches, ( 373-381). Oxford, UK: Blackwell Science.

Research Summaries/Brochures (listed in chronological order, most recent first):
Cohen, N.J., Lojkasek, M., Zadeh, Z., Farnia, F., Pugliese, M., & Kiefer, H. (October, 2007). Children Adopted from China: A study of the health, growth, and development.

Nancy J. Cohen, J. Duvall, James C. Coyne. (January, 1994). Mental service needs of post-adoptive families. Executive Summary. Sponsored by Children’s Aid Society in York Region, Newmarket, Ontario.

ADOLESCENCE

Journal Articles (listed in chronological order, most recent first):
Korenblum, M. (October 2004). Antidepressant use in adolescence: We’re asking the wrong questions. Paediatric Viewpoint. Paediatrics & Child Health, 9, No. 8, 539-540.

Korenblum, M. (August, 2004). Medicating ADHD: the doctor, parent, teacher triangle. National Review of Medicine,1.

Korenblum, M. (May, 2004). Depression in teens. Round Table, dialogues in medical management, Parkhurst Exchange, 124-128.

Korenblum, M. (Fall 2000). Recognizing the warning signs. Network, 16, 3, 8-10.

Cameron, P., Lescz, M., Bebchuk, W., Swinson, R., Antony, M., Azim, H. Doidge, N., Korenblum, M., et al. (1999). The Practice and Roles of the Psychotherapies: A discussion paper. Working Group 1 of the Canadian Psychiatry Association Psychotherapies Steering Committee. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 44, Supp. 1, 18S-31S.

Barwick, M.A., & Siegel, L.S. (1996). Learning difficulties in adolescent clients of a shelter for runaway and homeless street youths. Journal of Research on Adolescence, 6, 649-670.

Book Chapter:
Hilburn-Cobb, C. (1998). Adaptation within a hierarchy of behavioural systems: attachment, controlling and frankly disorganized behaviour and adolescent psychopathology, Chapter for L.Atkinson (Ed.), Proceedings, 2nd International Conference on Attachment & Psychopathology. Toronto.

 

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PRODUCTS FOR PURCHASE

To purchase these products please contact: M. Kimball at (phone) 416 972-1935, Ext.: 3309, e-mail: institute.research@hincksdellcrest.org

Manuals

Muir, E., Lojkasek, M., & Cohen, N.J. (1999). WATCH, WAIT, AND WONDER: A Manual Describing a Dyadic Infant-led Approach to Problems in Infancy and Early Childhood

Cohen, N.J., & Duvall, J.D. (1996). The Family Attachment Program: An innovative program for working with families adopting older children.

Cohen, Nancy, J., Kiefer, H., Pape, B. (2004) Handle with Care: Strategies for Promoting the Mental Health of Young Children in Community-Based Child Care

Handle with Care Strategy Booklet:


Booklet available in English and French versions
Cohen, N. J., & Kiefer, H., & Pape, B. (2004). Handle with Care: Strategies for Promoting the Mental Health of Young Children in Community-Based Child Care

Handle with Care Training Manuals:


Training Manuals Available in English and French versions
Kiefer, H., Cohen, N.J., & Pape, B. (2008). Handle with Care: Strategies for Promoting the Mental Health of Young Children in Community-Based Child Care. Facilitator Manual.

Kiefer, H., Cohen, N.J., & Pape, B. (2008). Handle with Care: Strategies for Promoting the Mental Health of Young Children in Community-Based Child Care. Training Participant Manual.

Video for Purchase ( Adolescence):


Dubo, E., Vasic, B., Conn, L., & Marshall Korenblum. The other side of blue: The truth about teenage depression. Available from: Canadian Learning CompanyTM, 95 Vansittart Avenue, Woodstock, Ontario.N4S 6E3. Telephone: (800) 267-2877, Fax: (519) 537-1035.

For more information contact: Dr. Nancy Cohen, e-mail nancy.cohen@utoronto.ca or by telephone at (416) 972-1935 Extension 3312, or M. Kimball at: institute.research@hincksdellcrest.org

The Research Department is committed to making research-based knowledge available to a wide range of audiences through a variety of media including: Journal articles, magazine articles and news media, presentations; treatment manuals; brochures; Websites.

Our audience include: Researchers, professionals, (e.g., practitioners, SLPs, & Special Education), students, Government, and funders’ organizations.

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